A Louvre Façade Lets You Play With Sunlight and Shade

 
What are louvre facades? You see them in office buildings and shopping center, in indoor and outdoor settings, enhancing the physical appearance of structures but also providing a valuable function as well. Danpal façade system are designed for the purpose of reducing the transfer of heat and the intensity of light, as well as improving a structure’s physical appearance. Installation can place the louvres against the building, or else they can be protruded in order to provide shading.
The traditional role of a typical façade system is not to play a structural role in a building’s design, but to prevent moisture from causing damage to the interior of that structure. Hail, wind, snow and rain are a building’s natural foes, one which it faces day after day. Danpal uses Microcell technology to defend a building from those harsh elements. Louvre facades are just as strong as a typical Danpal façade system, but they offer something extra. They let you, the consumer, decide how much of the external weather you want to invite inside. Nobody is going to welcome a downpour of rain or a snowstorm inside, but what about those bright and sunny days, when the air is fresh and the day is bright? That’s when Danpal’s daylighting architecture can let you and the sunlight meet on your terms while you’re inside. For those days when the sun is so bright that the glare is unbearable and the heat too intense, you still have control over how much of a hot summer day is going to come in. The louvres can be closed entirely to bring shade to your interior.

Louvre Facades Play With Sunlight and Shade

Wonder what Danpal is up to these days? What if we told you that Danpal, a leader in the building industry for over fifty years and a trailblazer in daylighting architecture, has been learning to play with sunlight and shade?
Danpalon® Louvre, a translucent shading system, empowers the customers to determine the balance of light and shade that is perfect for them, creating an internal atmosphere that meets their preferences. Louvre facades can be installed on various building types, and with the dazzling selection of colors and finishes for which Danpal is known, the result creates internal comfort and external beauty.
Along with that customized control over sunlight and shade comes the mastery over ventilation. Adding louvre facades to a structure allows for the welcome presence of fresh air coming in from outside and on a pleasant day, there’s nothing like the enticement of warm breezes to invigorate interior working and living space. If the day is cool and not conducive to open louvres, then they can be closed. This feature expands a building’s energy efficiency by allowing nature to carry some of the burden of adding comfort to the indoors, but always on your terms and according to your personal preferences.
Danpal designs the products. The architect designs the building. You, the customer, design your comfort zone.

Contact Danpal to discuss Louvre Façade for your next architectural project.

Newhaven Energy Recovery Facility, a Curvaceous Colosus

Imposing in size but well-integrated in its environment, the Newhaven Energy Recovery Facility on quite a difficult terrain, along the Ouse river, wedged between heterogeneous industrial buildings and residential areas, along a regional park.

The building is partially buried and emerges from the ground only 27 m high out of the 45 m required for the waste treatment process that is carried out over 200 m in length.

All that can be seen has been softened, rounded, curved to visually blur the building and reduce the impact on the environment. The building exterior is designed in three parts, which correspond to different stages of waste treatment.

On one side, the waste is received under a steel cladding, whereas at the other end an apse in porous textile covers the cooling elements. Between the two, a huge Danpalon® hall covers the processing pit and the heart of the system. During the day, light enters and lights up the installations. At night, the continuous activity of the building is gently enhanced with minimal light pollution.

In slightly cloudy weather, the milky appearance of the cladding allows it to almost merge with the sky, thus minimizing the visual impact of the imposing building. It was a difficult architectural choice to have made transparent what is usually opaque, and curve what is usually square. A choice that has had a positive effect as this treatment center has not been subject to the usual controversies that these kinds of projects are generally known to face.

 

Newhaven Energy Recovery FacilityDETAILS OF THE PROJECT:
Name of the Project:  Newhaven Energy Recovery Facility, UK
Applications: Facade + Skylight
Systems: Danpal Facade System + Danpal Roofing System
Thickness: 16mm, 1040mm
Colors: Clear Softlite
Company: Soprema
Architects : Jean Robert MAZAUD, S’pace
Installer: Lakesmere (UK)
Copyright: © S’PACE SA

 

Velodrome Couvert de Roubaix – An Elevated Cycling Ring

 

To lighten the construction, the ground floor is fully glazed and constitutes the foundation of the ring formed by Danpalon® supported by a metal framework. “This makes it possible to lift the translucent ring off the floor to give the impression that it is floating in the air, bringing light and airiness to the complex,” explains Thomas Houot, Architect from the ANAA agency.

velodrome couvert de roubaixApart from the rounded shape and the considerable height (11m) that it allows, Danpalon® has also been selected for its thermal and lighting properties, essential in this HQE project. “We had to limit energy consumption and we have sought to make maximum use of natural lighting.

The light we get through the structure is gentle and of excellent quality,” explains Thomas Houot.

“Furthermore, at night, we wanted the activity inside to be visible from the outside. In addition to specific lighting for the track, we placed polycarbonate tubes with fluorescent light sources on top of the walking frames and terraces. At night the structure becomes transparent and the building looks like a lantern”.

DETAILS OF THE PROJECT:
Name of the Project: Velodrome Couvert de Roubaix
Application: Façade
System: Danpal Façade System
Thickness: Danpalon Panel 16mm, 20mm, Double Glazing
Architects: ANAA Architectes – Thomas Houot – BET TCE
Copyright: © David Coppieters

 

velodrome couvert de roubaix

Modern Architecture Solves Local Need

The Lusitania Paz de Colombia located in Medellin, Antioquia, Colombia, is a model of modern architecture. Lead architect, Camillo Avellaneda, explains the rationale behind the structural design.

Lusitania Paz De Colombia is very much in keeping with these goals. Nestled in the curve of the hills on one side, and presenting a modern façade on the street side, this lovely building incorporates basic geometric shapes – circles and a rectangle – that blend with the local terrain and accommodates the climate. Environmental considerations were paramount in the design since it connects with a large park and is very near a major waterway.

Lusitania The building, which uses materials from Danpal, incorporates white and translucent façade, relieved by splashes of strong color. One of the unique attributes of the Danpal Façade System is its ability to admit natural lighting while diffusing it to admit natural light without glare and without excessive solar heat gain. This allows architects to play with the way light behaves inside the building while providing shade against the strongest hours of sunlight.

The rectangular classroom, which attaches to the top of a circular section that nestles into the natural curve of the hills, is shaded by a translucent shell with created of an open-work of geometrical shapes made from 16mm Danpal Opal Carbonate panels. Medellin is located near the equator where strong sunlight is a factor in architectural planning. The Danpal Façade System makes it possible to provide shading and the opportunity for breezeways without sacrificing natural lighting in classrooms.

The central part of the building, a stack of three circular levels that house the administrative and instructor offices, the libraries and a laboratory preschool, is topped with a recreation area. A central well is drilled down through the circular layers of this structure and affords an open area for sheltered greenspace as well as an interior stairwell. Off-centered is another round structure that houses the auditorium and cafeteria. The playground can be approached from this side of the building or it can be accessed via a sweeping stair from the park side.

A video, “Seguimos entregando mejores espacios para aprender” from the National Education Ministry  shows a beautiful view of the completed building. It also features interviews with parents and children who are enjoying the new facility. The excitement on their faces leaves little doubt of the success of this beautifully designed learning space.

Colegio Lusitania Paz de Colombia is an example of architecture incorporates local geography with an advanced design to create efficient solar and thermal performance. The combination of polycarbonate and glass provides an inviting space for learning and for community activities. The school provides educational and cultural activities for hundreds of youngsters living in the city. The excitement the community feels about their building can be seen in the art work students have created to celebrate the school’s first year anniversary. The bright, diamond-like shapes of the façade are prominently featured in their drawings.

ArchDaily Selects Design using Danpal Materials as One of Their Top One Hundred

 

ArchDaily is an online news source for the newest, trendiest and best in architecture. Recently they create a “Top One Hundred” page, featuring stunning examples of architecture. Among the recent editorial picks for this feature page is Hwa Hun, which means Blooming House in Korean. Irohe KHM Architects, the designers, made expensive use of Danpalon, a material from Danpal, as well as the Danpal Façade System in creating the “Blooming House.”

A Home with an Unusual Design

DanpalLocated in Seoul, near Bukhansan Mountain, Hwa Hun is constructed using a special design so that it appears to unfold like a blossom amid the attractively constructed, but more ordinary, dwellings nearby. The bright exterior presents an irregular roof line that forms the outside “petals” of the house.

Inside, level areas of garden are connected by stairs and walkways to flow from the forecourt garden, up the sides to a rooftop garden. The whole assembly is an irregular polyhedron and was created in response to the owner’s request that the house be “living in nature.” The unusual design maximizes use of the steep, natural slope of the lot, and to maximize the use of daylight for home lighting.

The living spaces of Hwa Hun flow naturally from the green garden spaces; in fact, in many instances, they are tucked under the various gardens: the forecourt garden, which welcomes entrance from the street, the inner court garden, the stair garden and the waterfall garden. All of the inwardly facing skins – those that do not front onto the street – are covered with greenery. This includes grass, fruit trees, and garden beds so that not only is the house shape itself a blossom, but the inner spaces of this dwelling will grow and bloom as the plants mature.

The Architects Make Use of Translucent and Transparent Building Materials

The room designs are comfortable and practical; each is flooded with light – a design feature made possible, in part, by use of translucent and transparent panels, alternated with other materials. The translucent and transparent inner panels – essential for bringing light into the various rooms – makes extensive use of Danpalon. For example, the living room door and the door of the second floor room are both made of Danpalon set in wooden frames. The walls for the living room and the second floor room are double walled panels of Danpalon, and so is the hallway ceiling. The canopy is created using Danpalon over steel pipe.

The opaque exterior makes use of exposed concrete and stainless steel roofing panels. Triangular recessed windows are finished with aluminum pairing and triple glass. A tempered glass handrail adds to the feeling of light. Connective seams are angled to add visual interest while managing the integrity of the roofing material.

A Home That Reflects and Makes Use of the Natural Environment

DanpalThe end result is a living space that is visually interesting both outside and inside, and permits growing plants that range from grasses to the fruit trees previously mentioned. It even incorporates the waterfall garden, incorporating a peaceful and pleasing sound. Utilitarian areas, such as the parking garage with space for two cars and storage areas are tucked out of sight, yet are easy to access. The design includes a master bedroom and three smaller bedrooms, a master bath, living room, kitchen, dining room and utility room — there is even attic room at the top if a little more space is needed.

The view from the roof top garden, where young fruit trees are carefully braced, reveals that Hwa Hun is nestled in a valley, surrounded by tall mountains. The design of the house resembles those mountains, rooted as it is through the basement garage, then opening onto the street level from the first garden, then sweeping up the two outer stairs to the roof top garden. It would be very interesting to view this house at a time ten years in the future, when the trees will be more fully grown and when it will have been home to a family. It has all the potential to become a Blooming House, indeed.

Home designs such as Hwa Hun are made possible by modern building materials that maximize use of daylight without forcing the occupants to endure excessive solar gain or blinding glare. Building materials, such as those from Danpal, help make these modern designs possible by making available transparent, translucent and even opaque materials that combine light and color to create designs that could only have been dreamed of by earlier generations of architects.